Elizabeth Frood Illness

New Zealand-born Egyptologist and academic Elizabeth Anne Frood (born 1975) specializes in self-presentation and the study of non-royals. As an associate professor of Egyptology at the University of Oxford, she has been in this position since 2006. She is also a member of Oxford’s St Cross College and the director of the Griffith Institute.

In 2015, Frood was rendered inoperable. A sepsis-induced infection resulted in her losing a portion of her nose, which was subsequently reconstructed, as well as both of her lower legs. She also suffered significant loss of function in one ear and the use of her hands.

Elizabeth Frood Illness

In 2016, she started working part-time again, and in 2018, she went to Egypt for the first time since her recovery. When she returned to Egypt following her disability, she wrote an article for Oxford University’s website entitled “Returning to Egypt: Acquired Disability and Fieldwork.”

‘Tutankhamun in Color,’ a BBC documentary, aired on BBC4 in 2020 and marked her broadcasting debut. To better understand the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb, new colorization techniques were applied to the original black and white footage.

Also, she has appeared in a fashion campaign for Kintsugi, an inclusive fashion brand that borrows its name from the Japanese practice of lacquering broken pottery with gold,

What happened to Elizabeth Frood?

In 2015, Frood was rendered inoperable. Her nose was reconstructed, her legs were amputated below the knee, and the hearing in one ear and the use of her hands were severely impaired after she developed sepsis as a result of an infection.

For a while, Lizzie Frood was a healthy person, but then she began to suffer from a stomach illness. A diagnosis of sepsis has left her with no hands, legs, or nose for the rest of her life. In the three years since contracting sepsis, Frood has lost her legs, nose, and hands. Liz also had to have her nose reconstructed after having her hearing in one ear, most of her hand’s capability, and a lot it reconstructed.

Elizabeth Frood Illness

In 2016, she started working part-time again, and in 2018, she went to Egypt for the first time since her recovery. “Returning to Egypt: Acquired Disability and Fieldwork” is the title of an article she wrote for the University of Oxford website.

Tutankhamun in Color” will air on BBC4 in 2020, her first appearance as a television presenter for the BBC. To better understand the discovery of Tutankhamun’s tomb, new colorization techniques were applied to the original black and white footage.

Also, she has appeared in a fashion campaign for Kintsugi, an inclusive fashion brand that borrows its name from the Japanese practice of lacquering broken pottery with gold.

Also Read: Ashley Judd Illness: An Update on Her Health Condition & Wellness

Where Is Elizabeth Frood Now?

Elizabeth Frood Illness

It is a remarkable story that Professor Elizabeth Frood returned to Egyptology as a part-time professor in 2016.
Kintsugi’s latest campaign features Elizabeth, who nearly died from a blood illness in 2015.

While the professor’s injuries and “new normal” are still difficult to accept, she has come to accept them as part of her ongoing grief process.

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